Chicken bone broth

Styling: Carlie Monasso Photography: Samara Clifford

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While the benefits of bone broth have been known for centuries, it’s been enjoying a resurgence in recent times and it hasn’t taken me long to understand why  –  this recipe has been getting a regular workout at OMG HQ.

The list of health benefits is as long as my arm (okay, well that’s not hard) –  from boosting your immune system, to aiding gut healing and digestion.  It’s full of antioxidants, vitamins and essential minerals,  as well as collagen and gelatine which promotes the growth of strong healthy bones, skin, nails and hair.  It’s great for reducing inflammation too.

I’ve been having a warm cup in the mornings and I gotta tell you, it’s my new favourite way to kick start my day.   I can feel my body saying a big thanks from the moment it hits my tummy, I kid you not!  It  leaves me feeling energised and mentally alert, what’s more, my skin is glowing this winter and my nails have never felt so silky smooth… THANK YOU bone broth!  It tastes a ga-zillion times better than anything you’ll buy in a packet – cheaper too, and of course it makes ridiculous amount of sense to make left over bones go the extra mile, doesn’t it?

The first time I made it, I left the slow cooker on overnight and awoke in the wee hours to the smell of the most amazing aroma, with a tinge of jealousy as I presumed my neighbours had been cooking up a storm, until I excitedly realised this marvellous smell was my very own doing!

You will need:
1 – 1.5kg organic, free range chicken bones*
2 onions, quartered
1 bulb garlic (cloves peeled)
3cm slice fresh turmeric
3cm slice fresh ginger
1 bunch flat leaf parsley (or coriander)
Thyme (a few springs)
3 celery stalks
2 carrots, roughly chopped
1 chilli, chopped
1/2 cup organic apple cider vinegar (I use Braggs)
Water

What to do:
1.  Put the veggies, herbs and chicken bones in slow cooker (or large stock pot). Fill with water until 2cm above the chicken bones,  then add apple cider vinegar (this helps draw out calcium and other minerals from the bones)

2. Turn slow cooker on and let sit for at least 6 hours (if using a stock pot, and simmer on low for at least 2 hrs,  keep the lid ajar to avoid boiling the stock / ending up with burnt bones I learned this the hard way!)  The longer you let it cook, the more nutritious and tasty it will be – I aim for between 12-24 hours.

3. Strain the stock through a sieve and put in a glass container in the fridge, skim off the fat and serve on it’s own or use it in soups, stews and casseroles.  Store in the fridge or freezer.

 

Notes:

  • *Chickens raised in cages typically don’t produce  stock that gels – a jelly like consistency is a sign of a nutritious broth.
  • If you want to make your bones go the extra mile add more water to the bones and make another batch – this is great for cooking grains like quinoa, brown, rice and millet.

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Zara is a healthy home consultant, author and keynote speaker on a mission to empower 1 million people to takes steps towards a healthier home. Zara learned about the link between our homes and our health after going through two different types of cancer. Zara is passionate about shining the spotlight on what she believes to be the least understood health challenges of our time, and sharing the things she wishes she had known, that could have prevented the illnesses she has been through. Recognised as one of Australia’s leading health influencers, Zara was a finalist in the 2014 Bupa Health Influencer of the Year Awards. She has appeared on TEN News, Today Show and The Project, been featured in the Herald Sun, I Quit Sugar, and contributed Medibank’s Be. Magazine and Fairfax health online publications. Zara contributed to the National Breast Cancer Foundation’s first comprehensive report on breast cancer in young women in Australia.

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